Research › Impressionism: The Art of Landscape
1st Museum Barberini Conference
In preparation for the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

Impressionist landscapes are often seen as spontaneous and unplanned. However, even the most abstract images captured precise depictions of the scenery—a telling argument that counters an interpretation of impressionist works as arbitrary mood paintings. The first Museum Barberini conference addressed this exciting area on June 28, 2016.

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

In preparation for the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

Impressionist landscapes are often seen as spontaneous and unplanned. However, even the most abstract images captured precise depictions of the scenery—a telling argument that counters an interpretation of impressionist works as arbitrary mood paintings. The first Museum Barberini conference addressed this exciting area on June 28, 2016.

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

Interview with Ortrud Westheider
Interview with Christoph Heinrich
Interview with Stephen F. Eisenman
Interview with Nancy Ireson
Interview with Richard Shiff
Interview with Stefan Koldehoff
Research › Impressionism: The Art of Landscape
Catalogue
On the occasion of the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

The catalogue for the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape is published by Prestel Verlag and edited by Ortrud Westheider and Michael Philipp with essays by Stephen F. Eisenman, Christoph Heinrich, Stefan Koldehoff, Richard Shiff, and Ortrud Westheider. They demonstrate that impressionism is no longer about narrating a story but about the act of seeing. Freed of historical and symbolic references, landscapes therefore became the central genre in impressionism.

24 x 30 cm, approx. 248 pages, approx. 170 ills.

Price at the museum shop: € 29.90 (sold out)

Booktrade edition: € 39.95

On the occasion of the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

The catalogue for the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape is published by Prestel Verlag and edited by Ortrud Westheider and Michael Philipp with essays by Stephen F. Eisenman, Christoph Heinrich, Stefan Koldehoff, Richard Shiff, and Ortrud Westheider. They demonstrate that impressionism is no longer about narrating a story but about the act of seeing. Freed of historical and symbolic references, landscapes therefore became the central genre in impressionism.

24 x 30 cm, approx. 248 pages, approx. 170 ills.

Price at the museum shop: € 29.90 (sold out)

Booktrade edition: € 39.95

Research › Impressionism: The Art of Landscape
What Kind of Sky is This?
Meteorological Associations Regarding Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

The Impressionists were masters at depicting various times of day and seasons of the year: shimmering light, jangling cold, approaching storms, the glow of dawn. Meteorologist Franz Ossing shows how accurately we can read the weather in Monet and his fellow artists’ paintings. In his essay, he examines the weather in works of art by comparing them to photos of cumulus clouds and even purple umbrae on the horizon.

This essay is based on the talk that Franz Ossing held at the Museum Barberini on April 6, 2017.

You can read the article online at GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ.

Read more

Alfred Sisley: Winter Morning, 1874, private collection

Alfred Sisley: Winter Morning, 1874, private collection

Meteorological Associations Regarding Impressionism: The Art of Landscape

The Impressionists were masters at depicting various times of day and seasons of the year: shimmering light, jangling cold, approaching storms, the glow of dawn. Meteorologist Franz Ossing shows how accurately we can read the weather in Monet and his fellow artists’ paintings. In his essay, he examines the weather in works of art by comparing them to photos of cumulus clouds and even purple umbrae on the horizon.

This essay is based on the talk that Franz Ossing held at the Museum Barberini on April 6, 2017.

You can read the article online at GeoForschungsZentrum GFZ.

Alfred Sisley: Winter Morning, 1874, private collection

Alfred Sisley: Winter Morning, 1874, private collection

Read more

Research › From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art
2nd Museum Barberini Conference
In preparation for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art

The museum invited to its conference on November 21, 2016 in preparation for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art (June 17 to October 3, 2017). Lectures and discussions focused on the development of American art from impressionism to abstract expressionism.

The spotlight was on The Phillips Collection (Washington D.C.), one of the most important private collections in the Unites States. The collector Duncan Phillips introduced artists such as Edward Hopper (1882–1967) and Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) to a broader public.

Speakers were Susan Behrends Frank (The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.), Alexia Poth (Bauhaus-Archive, Dessau), Susanne Scharf (Universität Frankfurt), Ortrud Westheider (Museum Barberini, Potsdam), and Sylvia Yount (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York).

Download program (pdf)

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

In preparation for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art

The museum invited to its conference on November 21, 2016 in preparation for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art (June 17 to October 3, 2017). Lectures and discussions focused on the development of American art from impressionism to abstract expressionism.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

The museum invited to its conference on November 21, 2016 in preparation for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art (June 17 to October 3, 2017). Lectures and discussions focused on the development of American art from impressionism to abstract expressionism.

The spotlight was on The Phillips Collection (Washington D.C.), one of the most important private collections in the Unites States. The collector Duncan Phillips introduced artists such as Edward Hopper (1882–1967) and Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) to a broader public.

Speakers were Susan Behrends Frank (The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.), Alexia Poth (Bauhaus-Archive, Dessau), Susanne Scharf (Universität Frankfurt), Ortrud Westheider (Museum Barberini, Potsdam), and Sylvia Yount (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York).

Download program (pdf)

Research › From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art
Catalogue
On the occasion of the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art

The catalogue for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art​ is published by Prestel Verlag and edited by Ortrud Westheider and Michael Philipp with essays by Susan Behrends Frank, Alexia Pooth, Susanne Scharf, Corinna Thierolf, Ortrud Westheider, and Sylvia Yount. They demonstrate that impressionism is no longer about narrating a story but about the act of seeing. Freed of historical and symbolic references, landscapes therefore became the central genre in impressionism.

24 x 30 cm, 248 pages, 200 illustrations

Price at the museum shop: € 29.95

Booktrade edition: € 39.95

Order a catalogue

On the occasion of the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art

The catalogue for the exhibition From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art​ is published by Prestel Verlag and edited by Ortrud Westheider and Michael Philipp with essays by Susan Behrends Frank, Alexia Pooth, Susanne Scharf, Corinna Thierolf, Ortrud Westheider, and Sylvia Yount. They demonstrate that impressionism is no longer about narrating a story but about the act of seeing. Freed of historical and symbolic references, landscapes therefore became the central genre in impressionism.

24 x 30 cm, 248 pages, 200 illustrations

Price at the museum shop: € 29.95

Booktrade edition: € 39.95

Order a catalogue

Research › Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage
3rd Museum Barberini Conference
In preparation for the exhibition Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage

The museum invited to its third conference on March 29, 2017. Lectures and discussions introduced the exhibition Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage. The conference had been organized in cooperation with the Kunsthalle Bremen where the exhibition will be on display from September 30, 2017 to February 4, 2018. The show can be seen at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam from February 24 to June 10, 2018.

Admission € 10
Students admitted free of charge

Download program (pdf)

Max Beckmann: Dance Apache, 1938, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Max Beckmann: Dance Apache, 1938, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

In preparation for the exhibition Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage

The museum invited to its third conference on March 29, 2017. Lectures and discussions introduced the exhibition Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage. The conference had been organized in cooperation with the Kunsthalle Bremen where the exhibition will be on display from September 30, 2017 to February 4, 2018. The show can be seen at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam from February 24 to June 10, 2018.

Admission € 10
Students admitted free of charge

Max Beckmann: Dance Apache, 1938, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Max Beckmann: Dance Apache, 1938, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2017

Download program (pdf)

Research › Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR
4th Museum Barberini Conference
In preparation for the exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR

In East Germany, art was subject to political policy. Numerous exhibitions in the past years have examined this ideological aspect of art. But what did artists see when they turned their critical gaze on their own self-image and their relationship to their state-mandated role? The exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR explores the various ways East German artists walked the fine line between their position as role models and their withdrawal from society, and between the collectivism prescribed by the state and their own creative individuality.

The museum invited to its forth conference on April 24, 2017. Lectures and discussions introduced the exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR. The show can be seen at the Museum Barberini from October 28, 2017 to February 4, 2018.

Download program (pdf)

Wolfgang Mattheuer: The Gray Window, 1969, Museum Barberini, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2018

Wolfgang Mattheuer: The Gray Window, 1969, Museum Barberini, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2018

In preparation for the exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR

In East Germany, art was subject to political policy. Numerous exhibitions in the past years have examined this ideological aspect of art. But what did artists see when they turned their critical gaze on their own self-image and their relationship to their state-mandated role? The exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR explores the various ways East German artists walked the fine line between their position as role models and their withdrawal from society, and between the collectivism prescribed by the state and their own creative individuality.

The museum invited to its forth conference on April 24, 2017. Lectures and discussions introduced the exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR. The show can be seen at the Museum Barberini from October 28, 2017 to February 4, 2018.

Wolfgang Mattheuer: The Gray Window, 1969, Museum Barberini, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2018

Wolfgang Mattheuer: The Gray Window, 1969, Museum Barberini, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2018

Download program (pdf)

Research › Henri-Edmond Cross: Painting Happiness
5th Museum Barberini Conference
In preparation for the exhibition Henri-Edmond Cross: Painting Happiness

In the 1880s a style of painting emerged from Impressionism. Known as Pointillism, it placed small brilliant dabs of paint next to each other, fragmenting reality into single bits of color. One of its most important representatives was Henri-Edmond Cross (1856–1910), who was a follower of anarchist principles promoting a Utopian society. In cooperation with the Musée des Impressionnismes Giverny, the Museum Barberini will be showing the first retrospective of this Neo-Impressionist’s work in Germany in the fall of 2018. Talks by Marina Ferretti, Annette Haudequet, Monique Nonne, and others will present this French artist in the context of European modernism.

The conference on Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 10 am–6 pm, has been organized on the occasion of the forthcoming exhibition to be held from November 17, 2018 to February 17, 2019 at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam. The lectures given at the conference will be published in the exhibition catalog.

Download program (pdf)

In preparation for the exhibition Henri-Edmond Cross: Painting Happiness

In the 1880s a style of painting emerged from Impressionism. Known as Pointillism, it placed small brilliant dabs of paint next to each other, fragmenting reality into single bits of color. One of its most important representatives was Henri-Edmond Cross (1856–1910), who was a follower of anarchist principles promoting a Utopian society. In cooperation with the Musée des Impressionnismes Giverny, the Museum Barberini will be showing the first retrospective of this Neo-Impressionist’s work in Germany in the fall of 2018. Talks by Marina Ferretti, Annette Haudequet, Monique Nonne, and others will present this French artist in the context of European modernism.

The conference on Wednesday, December 13, 2017, 10 am–6 pm, has been organized on the occasion of the forthcoming exhibition to be held from November 17, 2018 to February 17, 2019 at the Museum Barberini in Potsdam. The lectures given at the conference will be published in the exhibition catalog.

Download program (pdf)