Current

Monet: Places
February 22 to July 19, 2020

For his landscape paintings, Claude Monet revisited the same places over and over again and completed extensive series of works from a single location. During his travels he created numerous paintings at the coast of Normandy, in Zaandam in the Netherlands or in London and Venice. He was not interested in picturesque landmarks but in the changing light and weather conditions and the different effects they had on these particular places. He took pleasure in motifs such as parks, gardens, and waterlilies that surrounded him where he lived in Paris, Argenteuil, Vétheuil, and Giverny, using them to further his exploration of light and color.

Organized in cooperation with the Denver Art Museum where the exhibition was shown in Denver under the title Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature from October 20, 2019 to February 2, 2020.

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Photo: David von Becker, © Museum Barberini

Photo: David von Becker, © Museum Barberini

February 22 to July 19, 2020

For his landscape paintings, Claude Monet revisited the same places over and over again and completed extensive series of works from a single location. During his travels he created numerous paintings at the coast of Normandy, in Zaandam in the Netherlands or in London and Venice. He was not interested in picturesque landmarks but in the changing light and weather conditions and the different effects they had on these particular places. He took pleasure in motifs such as parks, gardens, and waterlilies that surrounded him where he lived in Paris, Argenteuil, Vétheuil, and Giverny, using them to further his exploration of light and color.

Organized in cooperation with the Denver Art Museum where the exhibition was shown in Denver under the title Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature from October 20, 2019 to February 2, 2020.

Photo: David von Becker, © Museum Barberini

Photo: David von Becker, © Museum Barberini

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Jasper Johns: The 100 Monotypes
February 29 to July 19, 2020

Jasper Johns (b. 1930) is one of the leading artists of American Pop art. Well-known for his large-format paintings in bright, vibrant colors, he was also a prolific printmaker, and his graphic work puts the peintre-graveur on a par with Goya and Picasso. On the occasion of his 90th birthday on May 15, 2020, the Museum Barberini will present his most recent series, The 100 Monotypes, originally created with the intention of accompanying his catalogue raisonné (Wildenstein Plattner Institute, 2017).

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Jasper Johns, 8, Catalogue Raisonné, 2015 © Jasper Johns/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020, Photo: Porter Gillespie

Jasper Johns, 8, Catalogue Raisonné, 2015 © Jasper Johns/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020, Photo: Porter Gillespie

February 29 to July 19, 2020

Jasper Johns (b. 1930) is one of the leading artists of American Pop art. Well-known for his large-format paintings in bright, vibrant colors, he was also a prolific printmaker, and his graphic work puts the peintre-graveur on a par with Goya and Picasso. On the occasion of his 90th birthday on May 15, 2020, the Museum Barberini will present his most recent series, The 100 Monotypes, originally created with the intention of accompanying his catalogue raisonné (Wildenstein Plattner Institute, 2017).

Jasper Johns, 8, Catalogue Raisonné, 2015 © Jasper Johns/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020, Photo: Porter Gillespie

Jasper Johns, 8, Catalogue Raisonné, 2015 © Jasper Johns/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2020, Photo: Porter Gillespie

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Preview

Impressionism: The Hasso Plattner Collection
From September 7, 2020

From September 7, 2020, the Museum Barberini in Potsdam will show impressionist paintings from the extensive collection of Hasso Plattner, the museum’s founder. More than 100 masterpieces by Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, Henri-Edmond Cross, Paul Signac, and other impressionist and post-impressionist artists will be on permanent display. With 34 paintings by Claude Monet, there is no venue in Europe outside of Paris where visitors can see more works by this painter. Potsdam is thus becoming one of the most important centers of impressionist landscape painting in the world. As well as special exhibitions in cooperation with international partners, the Museum Barberini is now offering a permanent collection that is unique in Germany.

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Paul Signac: The Port at sunset, 1892, Private collection

Paul Signac: The Port at sunset, 1892, Private collection

From September 7, 2020

From September 7, 2020, the Museum Barberini in Potsdam will show impressionist paintings from the extensive collection of Hasso Plattner, the museum’s founder. More than 100 masterpieces by Claude Monet, Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot, Alfred Sisley, Camille Pissarro, Henri-Edmond Cross, Paul Signac, and other impressionist and post-impressionist artists will be on permanent display. With 34 paintings by Claude Monet, there is no venue in Europe outside of Paris where visitors can see more works by this painter. Potsdam is thus becoming one of the most important centers of impressionist landscape painting in the world. As well as special exhibitions in cooperation with international partners, the Museum Barberini is now offering a permanent collection that is unique in Germany.

Paul Signac: The Port at sunset, 1892, Private collection

Paul Signac: The Port at sunset, 1892, Private collection

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Impressionism in Russia: Dawn of the Avant-Garde
November 7, 2020, until February 14, 2021

In the late nineteenth century, many Russian artists took inspiration from the themes and techniques of the French impressionists. Portraying scenes of Russian everyday life en plein air, they tried to capture the fleeting moment in their paintings. Artists like Natalia Goncharova, Mikhail Larionov, and Kazimir Malevich, who later formed the avant-garde, developed their own new art from impressionist studies of light. Showing how international their pictorial language had become by 1900, the exhibition will integrate these Russian artists into the project of European modern art.

An exhibition of the Museum Barberini, Potsdam, in collaboration with the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

November 7, 2020, until February 14, 2021

In the late nineteenth century, many Russian artists took inspiration from the themes and techniques of the French impressionists. Portraying scenes of Russian everyday life en plein air, they tried to capture the fleeting moment in their paintings. Artists like Natalia Goncharova, Mikhail Larionov, and Kazimir Malevich, who later formed the avant-garde, developed their own new art from impressionist studies of light. Showing how international their pictorial language had become by 1900, the exhibition will integrate these Russian artists into the project of European modern art.

An exhibition of the Museum Barberini, Potsdam, in collaboration with the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Rembrandt’s Orient
March 13 until June 27, 2021

West Meets East in Dutch Art of the 17th Century

From tapestries to turbans and tulips, Rembrandt and his contemporaries repeatedly depicted objects from faraway countries. Their artworks bear testimony to the first globalization and show the influence of foreign cultures on the Netherlands of the seventeenth century. This was a period that was marked by a thirst for knowledge, a passion for collecting, and pride of ownership. The arts flourished, and painters created new kinds of history paintings, portraits, and still lifes. What these did not show, however, were the negative sides of this appropriation of the foreign, like slavery, trade wars, and deaths that occurred in the Dutch navy. In dialogue with current debates on the decolonization of collections, the exhibition will explore these historical images of the foreign and the imbalance of power between different cultures. With more than 100 works on view, the show will try to challenge the dominant Eurocentric narrative that endures to this day.

An exhibition of the Museum Barberini, Potsdam, in collaboration with the Kunstmuseum Basel, under the patronage of H. E. Wepke Kingma, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Germany.

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Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

March 13 until June 27, 2021

West Meets East in Dutch Art of the 17th Century

From tapestries to turbans and tulips, Rembrandt and his contemporaries repeatedly depicted objects from faraway countries. Their artworks bear testimony to the first globalization and show the influence of foreign cultures on the Netherlands of the seventeenth century. This was a period that was marked by a thirst for knowledge, a passion for collecting, and pride of ownership. The arts flourished, and painters created new kinds of history paintings, portraits, and still lifes. What these did not show, however, were the negative sides of this appropriation of the foreign, like slavery, trade wars, and deaths that occurred in the Dutch navy. In dialogue with current debates on the decolonization of collections, the exhibition will explore these historical images of the foreign and the imbalance of power between different cultures. With more than 100 works on view, the show will try to challenge the dominant Eurocentric narrative that endures to this day.

An exhibition of the Museum Barberini, Potsdam, in collaboration with the Kunstmuseum Basel, under the patronage of H. E. Wepke Kingma, Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Germany.

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

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Retrospect

2019

Vincent van Gogh: Still Life with a Plate of Onions, 1889, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

2018

Bernhard Heisig (1925–2011), Frederick the Great, oil on canvas, 70 x 50 cm. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

© Museum Barberini