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Van Gogh: Still Lifes
October 26, 2019 to February 2, 2020

From his first paintings to the colorful flower images of his later career, Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890) repeatedly painted still lifes. In this genre, he could try out various media and alternatives – from depicting space using light and shadow to experiments with color. The first exhibition on this theme will present 27 paintings and use them to analyze the key stages in van Gogh’s life and work.

In cooperation with the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, and the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. With loans from the Art Institute of Chicago, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.

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Vincent van Gogh: Still Life with a Plate of Onions, 1889, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Vincent van Gogh: Still Life with a Plate of Onions, 1889, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

October 26, 2019 to February 2, 2020

From his first paintings to the colorful flower images of his later career, Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890) repeatedly painted still lifes. In this genre, he could try out various media and alternatives – from depicting space using light and shadow to experiments with color. The first exhibition on this theme will present 27 paintings and use them to analyze the key stages in van Gogh’s life and work.

In cooperation with the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, and the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. With loans from the Art Institute of Chicago, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.

Vincent van Gogh: Still Life with a Plate of Onions, 1889, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Vincent van Gogh: Still Life with a Plate of Onions, 1889, Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

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Artists from the GDR: Works from the Museum Barberini Collection
November 17, 2018 to February 2, 2020

One focus of the Museum Barberini’s collection is on paintings by artists from the former East Germany. With the current presentation of the collection, Artists from the GDR, the Museum invites visitors to rediscover important artistic approaches to the GDR. The current theme Modern History Painting presents mythological, literary and religious themes with paintings by Gudrun Brüne, Ulrich Hachulla, Rolf Händler, Bernhard Heisig, Johannes Heisig, Walter Libuda, Werner Liebmann, Harald Metzkes, Arno Rink, Willi Sitte, and Werner Tübke. These groups of motifs, however, did not serve to glorify depictions of the state’s own history, as demanded by the authorities. Instead, the artists used these themes often as starting points for personal reflections or visualizations of universally human issues. Even after the dissolution of the GDR, many painters continued to work with these subjects, carrying on the tradition of modern history painting.

Three further thematic shows are on presentation since October 26 at the Museum Barberini: Aspects of the Pictorial, Melancholy, and Painting and Landscape.

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Bernhard Heisig (1925–2011), Frederick the Great, oil on canvas, 70 x 50 cm. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Bernhard Heisig (1925–2011), Frederick the Great, oil on canvas, 70 x 50 cm. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

November 17, 2018 to February 2, 2020

One focus of the Museum Barberini’s collection is on paintings by artists from the former East Germany. With the current presentation of the collection, Artists from the GDR, the Museum invites visitors to rediscover important artistic approaches to the GDR. The current theme Modern History Painting presents mythological, literary and religious themes with paintings by Gudrun Brüne, Ulrich Hachulla, Rolf Händler, Bernhard Heisig, Johannes Heisig, Walter Libuda, Werner Liebmann, Harald Metzkes, Arno Rink, Willi Sitte, and Werner Tübke. These groups of motifs, however, did not serve to glorify depictions of the state’s own history, as demanded by the authorities. Instead, the artists used these themes often as starting points for personal reflections or visualizations of universally human issues. Even after the dissolution of the GDR, many painters continued to work with these subjects, carrying on the tradition of modern history painting.

Three further thematic shows are on presentation since October 26 at the Museum Barberini: Aspects of the Pictorial, Melancholy, and Painting and Landscape.

Bernhard Heisig (1925–2011), Frederick the Great, oil on canvas, 70 x 50 cm. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

Bernhard Heisig (1925–2011), Frederick the Great, oil on canvas, 70 x 50 cm. © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn

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Monet: Places
February 22, 2020 to June 01, 2020

For his landscape paintings, Claude Monet revisited the same places over and over again and completed extensive series of works from a single location. During his travels he created numerous paintings at the coast of Normandy, in Zaandam in the Netherlands or in London and Venice. He was not interested in picturesque landmarks but in the changing light and weather conditions and the different effects they had on these particular places.

He took pleasure in motifs such as parks, gardens, and waterlilies that surrounded him where he lived in Paris, Argenteuil, Vétheuil, and Giverny, using them to further his exploration of light and color. Organized in cooperation with the Denver Art Museum the exhibition will be shown in Denver under the title Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature from October 20, 2019 to February 2, 2020.

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Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

February 22, 2020 to June 01, 2020

For his landscape paintings, Claude Monet revisited the same places over and over again and completed extensive series of works from a single location. During his travels he created numerous paintings at the coast of Normandy, in Zaandam in the Netherlands or in London and Venice. He was not interested in picturesque landmarks but in the changing light and weather conditions and the different effects they had on these particular places.

He took pleasure in motifs such as parks, gardens, and waterlilies that surrounded him where he lived in Paris, Argenteuil, Vétheuil, and Giverny, using them to further his exploration of light and color. Organized in cooperation with the Denver Art Museum the exhibition will be shown in Denver under the title Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature from October 20, 2019 to February 2, 2020.

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

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West Meets East
June 27 until October 11, 2020

The Orient in the Work of Rembrandt and His Dutch Contemporaries

Thanks to its extensive trade with Asia, Africa, and the Levant, the city of Amsterdam was a vast emporium of goods from the Near and Far East. Dutch writers and publishers added to these material objects an intellectual and historical context for a better understanding of the Orient. Rembrandt and other painters of the Dutch Golden Age drew freely from these sources to enrich their art.

In collaboration with the Kunstmuseum Basel

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

June 27 until October 11, 2020

The Orient in the Work of Rembrandt and His Dutch Contemporaries

Thanks to its extensive trade with Asia, Africa, and the Levant, the city of Amsterdam was a vast emporium of goods from the Near and Far East. Dutch writers and publishers added to these material objects an intellectual and historical context for a better understanding of the Orient. Rembrandt and other painters of the Dutch Golden Age drew freely from these sources to enrich their art.

In collaboration with the Kunstmuseum Basel

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Rembrandt van Rijn and studio (possibly Govaert Flinck), Man in oriental traditional dress (detail), ca. 1635, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Andrew W. Mellon Collection

Impressionism in Russia: Dawn of the Avant-Garde
November 7, 2020, until February 28, 2021

Many Russian artists were inspired by the painting techniques of the French impressionists. They painted en plein air and tried to capture the fleeting moment in their works. Other painters, who later became the avant-garde, developed their own new art from impressionist studies of light.

In collaboration with The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

November 7, 2020, until February 28, 2021

Many Russian artists were inspired by the painting techniques of the French impressionists. They painted en plein air and tried to capture the fleeting moment in their works. Other painters, who later became the avant-garde, developed their own new art from impressionist studies of light.

In collaboration with The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Ilja Repin, At the Boundary. Vera Repina with Her Children, 1879, oil on canvas, The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow.

Retrospect