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From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art

June 17 to October 3, 2017

From Hopper to Rothko: America's Road to Modern Art presents the development of North American painting in the first half of the 20th century. It illustrates three major themes – landscapes, portraits, and cityscapes – and follows the evolution of abstract painting during this time. After 1945, these developments culminated in Abstract Expressionism, and New York City became the new center of the art world. The show brings together 68 paintings from The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. The Museum Barberini presents 68 masterpieces from The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

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Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

From Hopper to Rothko: America's Road to Modern Art presents the development of North American painting in the first half of the 20th century. It illustrates three major themes – landscapes, portraits, and cityscapes – and follows the evolution of abstract painting during this time. After 1945, these developments culminated in Abstract Expressionism, and New York City became the new center of the art world. The show brings together 68 paintings from The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. The Museum Barberini presents 68 masterpieces from The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

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What's more
Contemporary Positions in the USA and Mexico
June 17 to Oktober 3, 2017

Along with Harold Joe Waldrum (1934–2003), Dan Namingha (*1950), and Rufino Tamayo (1899–1991), we are presenting three idiosyncratic modern art positions in the USA and Mexico.

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Harold Joe Waldrum: The Lost Church in Cleveland, New Mexico, ca, 2002, © The Estate of Harold Joe Waldrum

Harold Joe Waldrum: The Lost Church in Cleveland, New Mexico, ca, 2002, © The Estate of Harold Joe Waldrum

June 17 to Oktober 3, 2017

Along with Harold Joe Waldrum (1934–2003), Dan Namingha (*1950), and Rufino Tamayo (1899–1991), we are presenting three idiosyncratic modern art positions in the USA and Mexico.

Harold Joe Waldrum: The Lost Church in Cleveland, New Mexico, ca, 2002, © The Estate of Harold Joe Waldrum

Harold Joe Waldrum: The Lost Church in Cleveland, New Mexico, ca, 2002, © The Estate of Harold Joe Waldrum

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Rodin in Dialog with Monet
May 31 to Oktober 3, 2017

With 15 sculptures by Auguste Rodin and seven paintings by Claude Monet, this show recalls the joint exhibition of the two artists in Paris in 1889.

Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection

Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection

May 31 to Oktober 3, 2017

With 15 sculptures by Auguste Rodin and seven paintings by Claude Monet, this show recalls the joint exhibition of the two artists in Paris in 1889.

Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection

Claude Monet: Under the Poplars, 1887, private collection

Barberini Palace: Stories of a Building
January 23 to October 3, 2017

With the destruction of the Barberini Palace during the Second World War, Potsdam lost one of its most prestigious civic buildings. Although the entire interior was lost to fire, its history can be reconstructed to a great extent using historical documents, newspaper articles, personal recollections, and photographs.

Twelve sections expand on the history of the building and illustrate both historical developments in the building’s architecture and the various uses to which the Palace was put. Beginning with the construction of the palace in 1771/72 and the models used, the exhibition will document the remodeling carried out in the nineteenth century, its destruction in 1945, the temporary uses of the space from 1945 to 2012, and the elaborate reconstruction of the palace from 2013 to 2016.

Numerous documents recount the former inhabitants of the palace, its use as an administrative center and assembly house, in which, for example, concerts were held. The Museum Barberini assumes the public function of the building, continuing the tradition of providing a place for people to assemble through its program of exhibitions and events.

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Ernst Eichgrün: Palazzo Barberini, 1907, Potsdam Museum - Forum für Kunst und Geschichte

Ernst Eichgrün: Palazzo Barberini, 1907, Potsdam Museum - Forum für Kunst und Geschichte

With the destruction of the Barberini Palace during the Second World War, Potsdam lost one of its most prestigious civic buildings. Although the entire interior was lost to fire, its history can be reconstructed to a great extent using historical documents, newspaper articles, personal recollections, and photographs.

With the destruction of the Barberini Palace during the Second World War, Potsdam lost one of its most prestigious civic buildings. Although the entire interior was lost to fire, its history can be reconstructed to a great extent using historical documents, newspaper articles, personal recollections, and photographs.

Ernst Eichgrün: Palazzo Barberini, 1907, Potsdam Museum - Forum für Kunst und Geschichte

Ernst Eichgrün: Palazzo Barberini, 1907, Potsdam Museum - Forum für Kunst und Geschichte

Twelve sections expand on the history of the building and illustrate both historical developments in the building’s architecture and the various uses to which the Palace was put. Beginning with the construction of the palace in 1771/72 and the models used, the exhibition will document the remodeling carried out in the nineteenth century, its destruction in 1945, the temporary uses of the space from 1945 to 2012, and the elaborate reconstruction of the palace from 2013 to 2016.

Numerous documents recount the former inhabitants of the palace, its use as an administrative center and assembly house, in which, for example, concerts were held. The Museum Barberini assumes the public function of the building, continuing the tradition of providing a place for people to assemble through its program of exhibitions and events.

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Artists in the GDR: From the Collection of the Museum Barberini
January 23 to October 3, 2017

The Museum Barberini Collection includes paintings from the former East Germany. For the opening, two galleries present works ranging from Bernhard Heisig to Stefan Plenkers. One focus is on the work of Wolfgang Mattheuer, whose bronze Century Step has found a permanent home in the garden of the Museum Barberini. On the basis of this collection, we will be showing Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR in the fall of 2017.

Wolfgang Mattheuer: A Strange Evening, 1975, Museum Barberini, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf, © VG BILD-KUNST Bonn, 2016

Wolfgang Mattheuer: A Strange Evening, 1975, Museum Barberini, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf, © VG BILD-KUNST Bonn, 2016

January 23 to October 3, 2017

The Museum Barberini Collection includes paintings from the former East Germany. For the opening, two galleries present works ranging from Bernhard Heisig to Stefan Plenkers. One focus is on the work of Wolfgang Mattheuer, whose bronze Century Step has found a permanent home in the garden of the Museum Barberini. On the basis of this collection, we will be showing Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR in the fall of 2017.

Wolfgang Mattheuer: A Strange Evening, 1975, Museum Barberini, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf, © VG BILD-KUNST Bonn, 2016

Wolfgang Mattheuer: A Strange Evening, 1975, Museum Barberini, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf, © VG BILD-KUNST Bonn, 2016

Century Step hovers over Potsdam

Preview

Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR
October 29, 2017 to February 4, 2018

In East Germany, art was subject to political policy. Numerous exhibitions in the past years have examined this ideological aspect of art. But what did artists see when they turned their critical gaze on their own self-image and their relationship to their state-mandated role? The exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR explores the various ways East German artists walked the fine line between their position as role models and their withdrawal from society, and between the collectivism prescribed by the state and their own creative individuality.

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Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

October 29, 2017 to February 4, 2018

In East Germany, art was subject to political policy. Numerous exhibitions in the past years have examined this ideological aspect of art. But what did artists see when they turned their critical gaze on their own self-image and their relationship to their state-mandated role? The exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR explores the various ways East German artists walked the fine line between their position as role models and their withdrawal from society, and between the collectivism prescribed by the state and their own creative individuality.

Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

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Documentation: The Gallery of the Palace of the Republic
October 29, 2017 to February 4, 2018

The sixteen large gallery paintings are on display again for the first time in twenty years. These works on the question Are communists allowed to dream?, painted in 1975 at the peak of GDR state art, adorned the East Berlin building, home to parliament and major cultural facilities until 1990. Widely acclaimed in their day, they are striking illustrations of art as official embellishment.

Hans Vent: Menschen am Strand, 1975, Leihgabe der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Hans Vent: Menschen am Strand, 1975, Leihgabe der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

October 29, 2017 to February 4, 2018

The sixteen large gallery paintings are on display again for the first time in twenty years. These works on the question Are communists allowed to dream?, painted in 1975 at the peak of GDR state art, adorned the East Berlin building, home to parliament and major cultural facilities until 1990. Widely acclaimed in their day, they are striking illustrations of art as official embellishment.

Hans Vent: Menschen am Strand, 1975, Leihgabe der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Hans Vent: Menschen am Strand, 1975, Leihgabe der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage
February 24, 2018 to June 10, 2018

Many paintings by Max Beckmann (1884–1950) show the world of the theater, circus, and music halls. He presented his paintings as stages. Showmanship was a driving force behind his work. He viewed this ‘world theater’ as a model for basic human experiences.

Held in cooperation with the Kunsthalle Bremen where the exhibition will be shown from September 30, 2017 to February 4, 2018.

Max Beckmann: Self-Portrait with a Saxophone, 1930, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Max Beckmann: Self-Portrait with a Saxophone, 1930, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

February 24, 2018 to June 10, 2018

Many paintings by Max Beckmann (1884–1950) show the world of the theater, circus, and music halls. He presented his paintings as stages. Showmanship was a driving force behind his work. He viewed this ‘world theater’ as a model for basic human experiences.

Held in cooperation with the Kunsthalle Bremen where the exhibition will be shown from September 30, 2017 to February 4, 2018.

Max Beckmann: Self-Portrait with a Saxophone, 1930, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Max Beckmann: Self-Portrait with a Saxophone, 1930, Kunsthalle Bremen – Der Kunstverein in Bremen, Photo: Lars Lohrisch, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Klaus Fußmann: People and Landscapes
February 24, 2018 to June 10, 2018

Klaus Fußmann has been exploring people in spaces since the 1970s. Early on, he began replacing depictions in interiors with figures in landscapes. These frequently large, nearly square works show people confronting their viewers head-on. They are often friends or relatives of the painter, but they may also be figures from fairy-tales or mythology. In the 1980s, the painter began portraying himself in the landscapes. He appears outdoors on large mirrors. In the past fifteen years, he has been applying his paint more thickly, turning the image space into a tactile experience.

This presentation will be shown in celebration of Klaus Fußmann’s eightieth birthday and will run parallel to the exhibition Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage.

Klaus Fußmann: Beveroe (Dance), 1982, private collection, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf

Klaus Fußmann: Beveroe (Dance), 1982, private collection, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf

February 24, 2018 to June 10, 2018

Klaus Fußmann has been exploring people in spaces since the 1970s. Early on, he began replacing depictions in interiors with figures in landscapes. These frequently large, nearly square works show people confronting their viewers head-on. They are often friends or relatives of the painter, but they may also be figures from fairy-tales or mythology. In the 1980s, the painter began portraying himself in the landscapes. He appears outdoors on large mirrors. In the past fifteen years, he has been applying his paint more thickly, turning the image space into a tactile experience.

This presentation will be shown in celebration of Klaus Fußmann’s eightieth birthday and will run parallel to the exhibition Max Beckmann: The World as a Stage.

Klaus Fußmann: Beveroe (Dance), 1982, private collection, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf

Klaus Fußmann: Beveroe (Dance), 1982, private collection, Photo: Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf

Gerhard Richter. Abstraction
June 30 to Oktober 21, 2018

The exhibition Gerhard Richter: Abstraction examines for the first time the abstract strategies and processes found in the artist’s complete works. The show was inspired by a work held by the Museum Barberini and brings together around 80 pieces from international museums and private collections.

Gerhard Richter began to challenge the idea of painting in the 1960s. Beginning with these early images, the exhibition follows the path of abstraction in Richter’s work to the present day. This includes his series of gray, monochromatic works from the 1970s, the black-and-white images in which he explored contemporary documents, and his group of abstract paintings that retain the marks of brushes, squeegees, and palette knives.

This exhibition is held in cooperation with the Gerhard Richter Archive of the Dresden State Art Collections.

On November 29, 2017, the Museum Barberini will develop the exhibition catalogue at its fifth conference. Contributors include Hubertus Butin, Dietmar Elger, and Ortrud Westheider.

November 29, 2017, 10 a.m.–6.30 p.m.
Entrance: € 10,–
Free entrance for students

Gerhard Richter: A B, Quiet, 1986, Museum Barberini © Gerhard Richter 2017 (0181)

Gerhard Richter: A B, Quiet, 1986, Museum Barberini © Gerhard Richter 2017 (0181)

June 30 to Oktober 21, 2018

The exhibition Gerhard Richter: Abstraction examines for the first time the abstract strategies and processes found in the artist’s complete works. The show was inspired by a work held by the Museum Barberini and brings together around 80 pieces from international museums and private collections.

Gerhard Richter began to challenge the idea of painting in the 1960s. Beginning with these early images, the exhibition follows the path of abstraction in Richter’s work to the present day. This includes his series of gray, monochromatic works from the 1970s, the black-and-white images in which he explored contemporary documents, and his group of abstract paintings that retain the marks of brushes, squeegees, and palette knives.

This exhibition is held in cooperation with the Gerhard Richter Archive of the Dresden State Art Collections.

On November 29, 2017, the Museum Barberini will develop the exhibition catalogue at its fifth conference. Contributors include Hubertus Butin, Dietmar Elger, and Ortrud Westheider.

November 29, 2017, 10 a.m.–6.30 p.m.
Entrance: € 10,–
Free entrance for students

Gerhard Richter: A B, Quiet, 1986, Museum Barberini © Gerhard Richter 2017 (0181)

Gerhard Richter: A B, Quiet, 1986, Museum Barberini © Gerhard Richter 2017 (0181)

Past

Past
Impressionism: The Art of Landscape
January 23 to May 28, 2017

We present the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape from January 23 to May 28, 2017. River and marine landscapes, fields and gardens in bloom, reflections on water, and winter landscapes were themes used by the Impressionists to carry out their experiments. With works by artists such as Claude Monet (1840–1926), Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919), and Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) the show brings major representatives of Impressionism to Potsdam, presenting artistic explorations into what at the time was a new, modern understanding of nature.

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Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

January 23 to May 28, 2017

We present the exhibition Impressionism: The Art of Landscape from January 23 to May 28, 2017. River and marine landscapes, fields and gardens in bloom, reflections on water, and winter landscapes were themes used by the Impressionists to carry out their experiments. With works by artists such as Claude Monet (1840–1926), Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919), and Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) the show brings major representatives of Impressionism to Potsdam, presenting artistic explorations into what at the time was a new, modern understanding of nature.

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

Gustave Caillebotte: The Argenteuil Bridge and the Seine, c. 1883, private collection

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Past
Modern Art Classics: Liebermann, Munch, Nolde, Kandinsky
January 23 to May 28, 2017

The exhibition Modern Art Classics (January 23 to May 28, 2017) draws a line from impressionism in Germany to fauvism in France and international abstract art. It will show works by Max Liebermann (1847–1935), Edvard Munch (1863–1944), Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944), and Andy Warhol (1928–1987).

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Edvard Munch: Summer Night by the Beach, 1902/03, private collection

Edvard Munch: Summer Night by the Beach, 1902/03, private collection

January 23 to May 28, 2017

The exhibition Modern Art Classics (January 23 to May 28, 2017) draws a line from impressionism in Germany to fauvism in France and international abstract art. It will show works by Max Liebermann (1847–1935), Edvard Munch (1863–1944), Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944), and Andy Warhol (1928–1987).

Edvard Munch: Summer Night by the Beach, 1902/03, private collection

Edvard Munch: Summer Night by the Beach, 1902/03, private collection

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