Exhibition and Visit › Tickets and Opening Hours

Plan your Visit


Opening Hours
Monday and from Wednesday 10 a.m.–7 p.m.
to Sunday
Last admission: 6 p.m.

Every first Thursday
Last admission: 8 p.m.

10 a.m.–9 p.m.

Tuesdays

closed


Open in the morning for kindergartens and schools with tour/workshop upon prior arrangement Monday to Friday (except Tuesday)


9 a.m.–11 a.m.

Admission

Regular € 14
Reduced rate € 10
Groups of 10 or more, p. p. € 10
Children and teens 17 and under
and secondary school pupils 18 and above
free


Barberini Guide (loaner devices)


€ 2

The following persons are eligible for reduced or discounted rates at the Museum Barberini upon presentation of a valid form of corresponding identification: Students, trainees (Auszubildende), civilian service volunteers (Freiwilliges Jahr, Bundesfreiwilligendienstleistende), persons with disabilities (min. 50%)


Public tours

Daily (except Tuesday)
€ 3 p. p. plus admission


11 a.m.
12 a.m.
3 p.m.


Thursday
€ 3 p. p. plus admission

5 p.m.

Sunday
€ 3 p. p. plus admission

3 p.m.


Children’s Art Activities

Saturday
€ 3 per child
11 a.m.
Please reserve tickets in advance on our website or at the ticket desk in the museum.
Front of Museum Barberini, Photo: Helge Mundt, © Museum Barberini

Front of Museum Barberini, Photo: Helge Mundt, © Museum Barberini

Current
From Hopper to Rothko: America’s Road to Modern Art
June 17 to October 3, 2017

From Hopper to Rothko: America's Road to Modern Art presents the development of North American painting in the first half of the 20th century. It illustrates three major themes – landscapes, portraits, and cityscapes – and follows the evolution of abstract painting during this time. The Museum Barberini presents rarely seen masterpieces from The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., one of the most important private collections in the United States.

Tickets

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Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

June 17 to October 3, 2017

From Hopper to Rothko: America's Road to Modern Art presents the development of North American painting in the first half of the 20th century. It illustrates three major themes – landscapes, portraits, and cityscapes – and follows the evolution of abstract painting during this time. The Museum Barberini presents rarely seen masterpieces from The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., one of the most important private collections in the United States.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Edward Hopper: Sunday, 1926, The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C.

Tickets

Learn more

Preview 2017/18
Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR
October 29, 2017 to February 4, 2018

In East Germany, art was subject to political policy. Numerous exhibitions in the past years have examined this ideological aspect of art. But what did artists see when they turned their critical gaze on their own self-image and their relationship to their state-mandated role? The exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR explores the various ways East German artists walked the fine line between their position as role models and their withdrawal from society, and between the collectivism prescribed by the state and their own creative individuality.

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Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

October 29, 2017 to February 4, 2018

In East Germany, art was subject to political policy. Numerous exhibitions in the past years have examined this ideological aspect of art. But what did artists see when they turned their critical gaze on their own self-image and their relationship to their state-mandated role? The exhibition Behind the Mask: Artists in the GDR explores the various ways East German artists walked the fine line between their position as role models and their withdrawal from society, and between the collectivism prescribed by the state and their own creative individuality.

Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Trak Wendisch: Tightrope Walker, 1984, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie, Photo: bpk / Nationalgalerie, SMB / Jörg P. Anders, © VG BILD-KUNST, Bonn 2017

Read more