Events

The entire museum is handicap accessible. The Barberini Museum offers special guided tours for people with disabilities.

Reading Aloud Day
Van Gogh’s Letters
Friday, November 15, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m

Museum visitors, museum staff, and students read from Van Gogh’s letters in Dutch and German

Vincent van Gogh loved writing letters. In a time before telephone and the internet, letters offered a way of communicating with faraway friends and family. More than 900 of the many letters that Van Gogh wrote have been preserved. Through his correspondence, we can follow the artist’s tumultuous life and artistic development.
Every year on the third Friday of November, Germany’s National Reading Aloud Day, the biggest festival of its kind in Germany, celebrates reading to others, and children and adults alike discover their passion for stories.

Friday, November 15, 2019
10 a.m.–6 p.m., every hour on the hour

Auditorium
Free for museum visitors

National Reading Aloud Day is an initiative of Die Zeit, Stiftung Lesen, and Deutsche Bahn Stiftung.

© Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

© Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Friday, November 15, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m

Museum visitors, museum staff, and students read from Van Gogh’s letters in Dutch and German

Vincent van Gogh loved writing letters. In a time before telephone and the internet, letters offered a way of communicating with faraway friends and family. More than 900 of the many letters that Van Gogh wrote have been preserved. Through his correspondence, we can follow the artist’s tumultuous life and artistic development.
Every year on the third Friday of November, Germany’s National Reading Aloud Day, the biggest festival of its kind in Germany, celebrates reading to others, and children and adults alike discover their passion for stories.

Friday, November 15, 2019
10 a.m.–6 p.m., every hour on the hour

Auditorium
Free for museum visitors

National Reading Aloud Day is an initiative of Die Zeit, Stiftung Lesen, and Deutsche Bahn Stiftung.

© Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

© Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Reading & Talk
Someone has a great fire in his soul: Van Gogh’s Letters
Wednesday, November 20, 7 pm

Ulrich Matthes, actor
Nienke Bakker, curator Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
Dr. Michael Philipp, Chief Curator Museum Barberini


Madness and self-destruction, a creative genius unrecognized in his lifetime—this is the myth of Van Gogh to this day. Yet there are few artists whose lives are so thoroughly and eloquently documented. By the time of his death in 1890, the painter had written more than 900 letters, most of them to his brother Theo to whom he was very close. Documenting his treatment of color, his technique and motifs, these letters give us detailed insights into the life of an exceptional artist. An invaluable source for our understanding of Van Gogh’s artistic development, they are also a moving human testimony and great literature.
Ulrich Matthes will read from Van Gogh’s letters. In conversation with Michael Philipp, Nienke Bakker, co-editor of the new scholarly edition, will discuss her extensive work on this project and the new insights she has gained into Van Gogh’s life and work.

Wednesday, November 20, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
This event is already sold out.

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Ulrich Matthes, Photo: private

Ulrich Matthes, Photo: private

Wednesday, November 20, 7 pm

Ulrich Matthes, actor
Nienke Bakker, curator Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
Dr. Michael Philipp, Chief Curator Museum Barberini


Madness and self-destruction, a creative genius unrecognized in his lifetime—this is the myth of Van Gogh to this day. Yet there are few artists whose lives are so thoroughly and eloquently documented. By the time of his death in 1890, the painter had written more than 900 letters, most of them to his brother Theo to whom he was very close. Documenting his treatment of color, his technique and motifs, these letters give us detailed insights into the life of an exceptional artist. An invaluable source for our understanding of Van Gogh’s artistic development, they are also a moving human testimony and great literature.
Ulrich Matthes will read from Van Gogh’s letters. In conversation with Michael Philipp, Nienke Bakker, co-editor of the new scholarly edition, will discuss her extensive work on this project and the new insights she has gained into Van Gogh’s life and work.

Wednesday, November 20, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
This event is already sold out.

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Ulrich Matthes, Photo: private

Ulrich Matthes, Photo: private

Talk & conversation
The Van Gogh Coup: Rise and Fall of the Forger Otto Wacker
Wednesday, November 27, 7 p.m.

Stefan Koldehoff, journalist and art market specialist, Cologne
Dr. Michael Philipp, Chief Curator, Museum Barberini


It was one of the most spectacular art scandals of the Weimar Republic: In 1932, the art dealer Otto Wacker went on trial in Berlin for having sold some thirty fake Van Gogh paintings. Renowned experts had previously confirmed that the paintings were genuine, and well-known collectors had bought them for large sums. The journalist and art market specialist Stefan Koldehoff has been researching Van Gogh, as well as crime in the art market, for many years, often in collaboration with Nora Koldehoff. After discovering new material on the Otto Wacker case, Nora and Stefan Koldehoff concluded that a scandal like this would be just as possible today as it was 90 years ago. In conversation with Michael Philipp, Stefan Koldehoff will discuss the historical context of the scandal and Otto Wacker’s life during the Nazi period and in the GDR. Wacker lived not far from Potsdam, in the village of Ferch on the Schwielowsee.

Wednesday, November 27, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

Vincent Van Gogh, Grapes, Lemons, Pears and Apples, 1887, © The Art Institute of Chicago. Photo: bpk / The Art Institute of Chicago / Art Resource, NY

Vincent Van Gogh, Grapes, Lemons, Pears and Apples, 1887, © The Art Institute of Chicago. Photo: bpk / The Art Institute of Chicago / Art Resource, NY

Wednesday, November 27, 7 p.m.

Stefan Koldehoff, journalist and art market specialist, Cologne
Dr. Michael Philipp, Chief Curator, Museum Barberini


It was one of the most spectacular art scandals of the Weimar Republic: In 1932, the art dealer Otto Wacker went on trial in Berlin for having sold some thirty fake Van Gogh paintings. Renowned experts had previously confirmed that the paintings were genuine, and well-known collectors had bought them for large sums. The journalist and art market specialist Stefan Koldehoff has been researching Van Gogh, as well as crime in the art market, for many years, often in collaboration with Nora Koldehoff. After discovering new material on the Otto Wacker case, Nora and Stefan Koldehoff concluded that a scandal like this would be just as possible today as it was 90 years ago. In conversation with Michael Philipp, Stefan Koldehoff will discuss the historical context of the scandal and Otto Wacker’s life during the Nazi period and in the GDR. Wacker lived not far from Potsdam, in the village of Ferch on the Schwielowsee.

Wednesday, November 27, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Vincent Van Gogh, Grapes, Lemons, Pears and Apples, 1887, © The Art Institute of Chicago. Photo: bpk / The Art Institute of Chicago / Art Resource, NY

Vincent Van Gogh, Grapes, Lemons, Pears and Apples, 1887, © The Art Institute of Chicago. Photo: bpk / The Art Institute of Chicago / Art Resource, NY

Tickets

KlangFarben
Stillness in Motion, Audible Stillness
Thursday, November 28, 7 p.m.

Is there such a thing as a musical still life? The terms “music” and “still” contradict each other, for music never remains in one place, never stays still. On the contrary, music leads us beyond stillness and unfolds within time. And yet there is a connection between Van Gogh’s still lifes and the music of his time: What is so compelling about his works, which are anything but calm and meditative depictions of reality, is a condensed, concentric motion that can also be found in music. Juxtaposing a selection of paintings from the exhibition with compositions by Van Gogh’s contemporaries, Ortrud Westheider and Clemens Goldberg talk about music and painting of this period.

Dr. Clemens Goldberg, author and critic, rbb Kulturradio
Dr. Ortrud Westheider, Director Museum Barberini
Members of the Kammerakademie Potsdam


Thursday, November 28, 2019, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
€ 25 / concessions € 20
In cooperation with Kammerakademie Potsdam.

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

Thursday, November 28, 7 p.m.

Is there such a thing as a musical still life? The terms “music” and “still” contradict each other, for music never remains in one place, never stays still. On the contrary, music leads us beyond stillness and unfolds within time. And yet there is a connection between Van Gogh’s still lifes and the music of his time: What is so compelling about his works, which are anything but calm and meditative depictions of reality, is a condensed, concentric motion that can also be found in music. Juxtaposing a selection of paintings from the exhibition with compositions by Van Gogh’s contemporaries, Ortrud Westheider and Clemens Goldberg talk about music and painting of this period.

Dr. Clemens Goldberg, author and critic, rbb Kulturradio
Dr. Ortrud Westheider, Director Museum Barberini
Members of the Kammerakademie Potsdam


Thursday, November 28, 2019, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
€ 25 / concessions € 20
In cooperation with Kammerakademie Potsdam.

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

The Art of Calm
Quiet Morning
Yoga and Meditation

For all early risers and art-loving yogis. Join a 90-minute yoga session on Sunday morning inspired by the current exhibition, taught by Anna and Sandra. From 11 o’clock, participants can enjoy the original paintings in quiet contemplation.

Sunday, December 1,
Sunday, January 5,
Sunday, January 5,

from 9:30 to 11 a.m.


€ 18 / reduced € 16 (per session)
The ticket price includes entry to the museum after the yoga session.

Please bring your own yoga mat and cushion.

In cooperation with Happy Yoga Potsdam/Berlin

Tickets

Yoga and Meditation

For all early risers and art-loving yogis. Join a 90-minute yoga session on Sunday morning inspired by the current exhibition, taught by Anna and Sandra. From 11 o’clock, participants can enjoy the original paintings in quiet contemplation.

Sunday, December 1,
Sunday, January 5,
Sunday, January 5,

from 9:30 to 11 a.m.


€ 18 / reduced € 16 (per session)
The ticket price includes entry to the museum after the yoga session.

Please bring your own yoga mat and cushion.

In cooperation with Happy Yoga Potsdam/Berlin

Tickets

Long Thursday!

Extra Tours and Cinema at the Museum Barberini

Every first Thursday of the month is Long Thursday! All exhibition rooms and the Café & Restaurant Barberini are open until 9 p.m., and there are special thematic tours as well as films in the auditorium.

Thursday,
November 7, December 5, 2019,
January 2, 2020


Special guided tour

The Power of Colors

Special guided tour exploring technique and color choice in Van Gogh’s still lifes
Peter Eurlings, art historian, Museum Barberini

Van Gogh was an autodidact, who during his ten active years as a painter paved the way for modern art. As a young artist in the Netherlands he explored the fundamental principles of painting, perspective, composition, and modeling. Later, in Paris, he developed his unique personal style: thickly applied paint, circular brushstroke, complementary color contrasts, as well as the perspectives and flatness of forms he admired in Japanese woodblock prints. We know from Van Gogh’s letters how closely he studied the expressiveness of color—both from a practical and theoretical perspective. How did Van Gogh learn the craft of painting? How did he work, and how did he tackle the difficulties of his medium? Intuitively and spontaneously or assiduously and methodically? Peter Eurlings discusses Van Gogh’s painting practice and reveals the importance of still lifes for his artistic development.

Thursday, November 7, December 5, 2019
7 p.m.

Foyer
€ 3

Early booking is recommended.

Vincent Van Gogh, Carafe and Dish with Citrus Fruit, 1887, © Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Vincent Van Gogh, Carafe and Dish with Citrus Fruit, 1887, © Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

Cinema at the auditorium

Adam & Evelyn
Direction and screenplay Andreas Goldstein, starring Florian Teichtmeister, Anne Kanis, Lena Lauzemis, Christin Alexandrow, Milian Zerzawy, Germany 2018, 100 min. (German original version)

Without resorting to clichés or stereotypes, Andreas Goldstein’s film, based on Ingo Schulze’s novel of the same name, tells the story of a young couple in East Berlin in the summer of 1989, just before the fall of the Iron Curtain. Adam and Evelyn are in love but still have things to sort out. Should they carry on as before or is it time to move on? Against the backdrop of TV and radio reports on events that are changing the world, the director narrates the couple’s journey through the landscapes of Lake Balaton in carefully composed images. It is a love story that develops in slow motion. Yet viewers can sense that Adam and Evelyn’s bucolic summer idyll is about to come to an end, as a tide of political change sweeps across Eastern Europe. An atmospheric film about a world turned upside down, and about what it meant for East Germans to leave their home and go West.

Thursday
November 7, 6:30 pm

Auditorium

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The Antagonists—Rivalry in Art: Van Gogh vs. Gauguin
Book & Dir. Andreas Gräfenstein, Camera: Philipp Baben der Erde Documentary, Germany 2016, 53 min.

Arles 1888. Vincent van Gogh’s dream comes true: Paul Gauguin has traveled to Provence, to Vincent’s Yellow House, his studio in the south. Van Gogh hopes that they will set up a progressive artist colony together. But things do not go as planned—the two men argue and fight about artistic techniques and models, and about women. After two months, the situation gets out of control. Van Gogh loses an ear, and a myth is born. The art historians Belinda Thomson, Sjraar van Heugten, and Nienke Bakker have researched the lives and works of these two pioneers of modern art for many years. They have also tried to find out what exactly might have happened in the Yellow House on the night of December 23.

Thursday
December 5, 6:30 pm

Auditorium

In cooperation with ARTE

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Gundermann
Dir. Andreas Dresen, starring Alexander Scheer, Anna Unterberger, Axel Prahl, Bjarne Mädel, Peter Sodann, feature film, Germany 2018, 127 min.

Gundermann, directed by Andreas Dresen (Night Shapes, 1999; Grill Point, 2002), tells the real-life story of Gerhard Gundermann, a successful singer-songwriter and coal miner in the former German Democratic Republic. Gundermann is a poet and idealist, a man of firmly held beliefs who nevertheless becomes a spy for the Stasi. His story, empathetically told, is a drama about entanglement and guilt, about denial and finally facing the past—and a multilayered film about GDR reality with all its contradictions.

Thursday
January 2, 2020, 6:30 pm
Auditorium

Free on presentation of a valid museum entry ticket. Spaces are limited and are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets are available at the museum ticket desk from 5:30 p.m. on the day of the screening.

Art Breakfast
Sunday at the Museum

Combine a breakfast at the Café Barberini with a tour of the current exhibition. Towards the end of the breakfast, an experienced guide will introduce visitors to the concept of the exhibition before providing more in-depth information about Van Gogh and his work while exploring each exhibit.

Sunday, December 8, 2019, January 12, 2020,
10 a.m.

(60 min. breakfast/50 min. tour)
Café Barberini/Foyer
fully booked

On presentation of a ticket, visitors will be able to purchase a breakfast for € 9 at the Café Barberini, consisting of a bagel with cream cheese (plus either jam or honey), muesli with yoghurt, fresh fruit and nuts, and a cup of coffee or tea.

Advance registration is recommended.

Sunday at the Museum

Combine a breakfast at the Café Barberini with a tour of the current exhibition. Towards the end of the breakfast, an experienced guide will introduce visitors to the concept of the exhibition before providing more in-depth information about Van Gogh and his work while exploring each exhibit.

Sunday, December 8, 2019, January 12, 2020,
10 a.m.

(60 min. breakfast/50 min. tour)
Café Barberini/Foyer
fully booked

On presentation of a ticket, visitors will be able to purchase a breakfast for € 9 at the Café Barberini, consisting of a bagel with cream cheese (plus either jam or honey), muesli with yoghurt, fresh fruit and nuts, and a cup of coffee or tea.

Advance registration is recommended.

Lecture
“On Van Gogheling”: Van Gogh and German Expressionism
Mittwoch, 22. Januar 2020, 19 Uhr

Dr. Alexander Eiling, Head of Modern Art, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main

In an article entitled “Vom Van Gogheln” (On Van Gogheling), published in 1910, the writer and journalist Ferdinand Avanarius described the enthusiastic response of German artists to Vincent van Gogh’s work: “Van Gogh is dead, but the van Gogh people are alive. And how alive they are! [...] There is Van Gogheling everywhere.”
For the generation that followed Van Gogh, the artist’s unique, anti-academic approach to depicting nature offered both liberation and encouragement. But the responses of different artists varied considerably. Some found their own, individual path; others remained in the shadow of their model. The lecture will explore Van Gogh’s reception in Germany at the start of the twentieth century and his influence on German expressionists.

Alexander Eiling is Head of the Department of Modern Art at the Städel Museum in Frankfurt am Main and co-curator of the exhibition Making Van Gogh: A German Love Story, which will be on show until February 16, 2020.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

Vincent Van Gogh, Blossoming Chestnut Branches, 1890, Emil Bührle Collection, Zurich

Vincent Van Gogh, Blossoming Chestnut Branches, 1890, Emil Bührle Collection, Zurich

Mittwoch, 22. Januar 2020, 19 Uhr

Dr. Alexander Eiling, Head of Modern Art, Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main

In an article entitled “Vom Van Gogheln” (On Van Gogheling), published in 1910, the writer and journalist Ferdinand Avanarius described the enthusiastic response of German artists to Vincent van Gogh’s work: “Van Gogh is dead, but the van Gogh people are alive. And how alive they are! [...] There is Van Gogheling everywhere.”
For the generation that followed Van Gogh, the artist’s unique, anti-academic approach to depicting nature offered both liberation and encouragement. But the responses of different artists varied considerably. Some found their own, individual path; others remained in the shadow of their model. The lecture will explore Van Gogh’s reception in Germany at the start of the twentieth century and his influence on German expressionists.

Alexander Eiling is Head of the Department of Modern Art at the Städel Museum in Frankfurt am Main and co-curator of the exhibition Making Van Gogh: A German Love Story, which will be on show until February 16, 2020.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020, 7 p.m.
Auditorium
€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Vincent Van Gogh, Blossoming Chestnut Branches, 1890, Emil Bührle Collection, Zurich

Vincent Van Gogh, Blossoming Chestnut Branches, 1890, Emil Bührle Collection, Zurich

Tickets

Art and religion in dialogue
The Language of Objects
Thursday, January 23, 2020, 5 p.m.

Superintendent Angelika Zädow, Evangelischer Kirchenkreis Potsdam
Dr. Dorothee Entrup, art historian, Museum Barberini


Van Gogh was deeply religious. In some of his still lifes he arranged objects like sacred items on an altar. Many of them are symbols for the artist’s emotional world or contain hidden messages. Taking a painting from the exhibition as a starting point, the conversation will explore Van Gogh’s work from an art-historical and theological perspective. There will be an opportunity to continue the conversation afterwards in the foyer.

Thursday, January 23, 2020, 5 p.m.
Foyer
€ 3 (excluding entry ticket)

In cooperation with Stadtkirchenarbeit Potsdam

Tickets

Vincent van Gogh, Still Life with Plaster Statuette, 1887, oil on canvas. © Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Vincent van Gogh, Still Life with Plaster Statuette, 1887, oil on canvas. © Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Thursday, January 23, 2020, 5 p.m.

Superintendent Angelika Zädow, Evangelischer Kirchenkreis Potsdam
Dr. Dorothee Entrup, art historian, Museum Barberini


Van Gogh was deeply religious. In some of his still lifes he arranged objects like sacred items on an altar. Many of them are symbols for the artist’s emotional world or contain hidden messages. Taking a painting from the exhibition as a starting point, the conversation will explore Van Gogh’s work from an art-historical and theological perspective. There will be an opportunity to continue the conversation afterwards in the foyer.

Thursday, January 23, 2020, 5 p.m.
Foyer
€ 3 (excluding entry ticket)

In cooperation with Stadtkirchenarbeit Potsdam

Vincent van Gogh, Still Life with Plaster Statuette, 1887, oil on canvas. © Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Vincent van Gogh, Still Life with Plaster Statuette, 1887, oil on canvas. © Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Tickets

Films
In cooperation with the Filmmuseum Potsdam

To accompany the exhibition Van Gogh: Still Lives, the Filmmuseum Potsdam is showing feature films and documentaries from several decades, which illuminate Van Gogh’s biography and artistic work in new and surprising ways.

Willem Dafoe (Vincent Van Gogh) in VAN GOGH © DCM

Willem Dafoe (Vincent Van Gogh) in VAN GOGH © DCM

In cooperation with the Filmmuseum Potsdam

To accompany the exhibition Van Gogh: Still Lives, the Filmmuseum Potsdam is showing feature films and documentaries from several decades, which illuminate Van Gogh’s biography and artistic work in new and surprising ways.

Willem Dafoe (Vincent Van Gogh) in VAN GOGH © DCM

Willem Dafoe (Vincent Van Gogh) in VAN GOGH © DCM

Information
All films are shown at the Filmmuseum Potsdam: 
Breite Str. 1a/Marstall, 14467 Potsdam, Germany 
Tickets for all screenings may be purchased at the Filmmuseum Potsdam.
Ticket reservations:  T +49 331 27181-12 or ticket@filmmuseum-potsdam.de

Please note: Visitors who present a Museum Barberini ticket at these screenings will receive a discount on their ticket to the Filmmuseum Potsdam. Ticketholders of these films will also receive discounted admission to the Museum Barberini.


Saturday, November 2, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

Vincent van Gogh. Der Weg nach Courrières
Dir. Christoph Hübner, Gabriele Voss, West Germany 1989, documentary, 89 min.

A film about Vincent van Gogh’s little known beginnings. Starting with footage from the auction of his Sunflowers at Christie’s in London in 1987, which raised record prices, this documentary traces the painter’s path from lay preacher to artist. Based on Van Gogh’s letters and testimonies from his contemporaries, the journey leads through landscapes he painted and places where he lived, interweaving past and present.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, November 30, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

At Eternity’s Gate
Dir. Julian Schnabel, starring Willem Dafoe, Oscar Isaac, Emmanuelle Seigner, Switzerland/UK/France/USA/Ireland 2018, English/French with German subtitles, 111 min.

Taking its title from a painting that Van Gogh created in the last year of his life, this feature film accompanies the painter during his most important creative period. Gauguin’s visit in Arles has been fraught with disagreements, and the friend’s departure has left Van Gogh devastated. After a one-year stay in a psychiatric clinic in Saint-Rémy, Van Gogh arrives in Auvers in May 1890. Within a short time, he creates more than 80 paintings there before his death only a few weeks later, at the age of 37. Rather than focusing on Van Gogh’s biography, Julian Schnabel, a renowned painter himself, tries to open up Van Gogh’s world to the viewer.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, December 7, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

Loving Vincent
Dir. Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Poland/UK 2017, animated feature, German version, 94 min.

The young Armand Roulin is asked by his father, the postmaster of Arles, to deliver the last letter that Vincent van Gogh wrote before his untimely death. Intrigued by the circumstances of the painter’s death, Roulin tries to reconstruct the events that led to it. For this animated film, 125 artists created 65,000 individual images—making it the first ever full-length feature to be entirely hand-painted in oil. Avoiding biographical sensationalism, the filmmakers have created a portrait of the artist through his works with a whodunnit narrative.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, December 14, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

Besuch bei van Gogh. Ein utopischer Film
Dir. Horst Seemann, starring Grazyna Szapolowska, Christian Grashof, Rolf Hoppe, GDR 1985, 104 min.

In the twenty-second century, antiquities and paintings command huge prices. When Marie, a doctor, needs more energy units for her research than she can afford, her boss has an idea: Marie is sent back to the nineteenth century in a time machine, where she is to buy paintings by Vincent van Gogh at bargain prices. The plan is successful, but Marie is reluctant to return to the present because she has fallen in love with Van Gogh—and with the unspoiled nature which inspires the painter.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, December 21, 2019, 7:30 p.m.

Vincent & Theo
Dir. Robert Altman, starring Tim Roth, Paul Rhys, USA 1990, original version, 51 min.

For the director Robert Altman the key to Van Gogh’s artistic biography and the history of the reception of his work can be found in the relationship between the brothers Vincent and Theo. A moving cinematic portrait that sheds light on the lives of the two brothers.

Supporting film: Van Gogh
Dir. Alain Resnais, France 1948, documentary, German version, 16 min.

Consisting entirely of details of Van Gogh’s paintings, complemented with music and text, this early short film by Alain Resnais marked the beginning of the artist biopic as a cinematic genre.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Friday, January 10, 2020, 7:30 p.m.

Van Gogh & Japan
Dir. David Bickerstaff, UK 2019, documentary, German version, 85 min.

Inspired by an exhibition of Japanese art, which he visited in Paris in 1886, Van Gogh took his art into a new, exciting direction. In 1888 he left Paris for the south of France, where he hoped to find a landscape like Japan’s. This documentary film is based on the exhibition of the same name held in Amsterdam in the summer of 2018, the first to explore the influence of Japanese art on Van Gogh’s work.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, January 25, 2020, 7:30 p.m.

Lust for Life
Dir. Vincente Minnelli, starring Kirk Douglas, Anthony Quinn, Pamela Brown, USA 1956, German version, 122 min.

This biopic by Vincente Minnelli traces Van Gogh’s path from his time as a lay preacher to his failed marriage, and narrates his life as a painter, from Paris to Arles, and his difficult friendship with Gauguin. The physicality of Kirk Douglas’s acting in the title role powerfully conveys the painter’s inner turmoil.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5