Events

The entire museum is handicap accessible. The Barberini Museum offers special guided tours for people with disabilities.

Long Thursday!
Extra Tours and Cinema at the Museum Barberini

Every first Thursday of the month is Long Thursday!All exhibition rooms and the Café & Restaurant Barberini are open until 9 p.m., and there are special thematic tours as well as films in the auditorium.

Extra Tours and Cinema at the Museum Barberini

Every first Thursday of the month is Long Thursday!All exhibition rooms and the Café & Restaurant Barberini are open until 9 p.m., and there are special thematic tours as well as films in the auditorium.

Curator-led tours
May 7

6 p.m., Foyer
booked out


Cinema at the Auditorium

Cézanne and I
Written and directed by Danièle Thompson, starring Guillaume Canet, Guillaume Gallienne, France 2016, 117 min.

They inspired each other, they often argued, and they always made it up again: Paul Cézanne, the headstrong painter, and Émile Zola, the successful writer. United in their quest for perfection and recognition, they were lifelong friends. Zola had money, fame, and a happy marriage; Cézanne would soon have none of those things. Tracing the parallel paths of these two outstanding artists, this biopic takes us on a journey through the history of French art and culture, from the Paris Salon des Refusés to the Dreyfus affair. Shot in original locations, the film reveals the visual world of one of Monet’s contemporaries and paints a vivid picture of an era.

Thursday
May 7, 2020, 6:30 pm
Auditorium

Free on presentation of a valid museum entry ticket. Spaces are limited and are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Tickets are available at the museum ticket desk from 5:30 p.m. on the day of the screening.

Talks
Talk
Jasper Johns and Beyond: Re-Viewing American Art in the 21st Century
Friday, May 15, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Adam D. Weinberg, Director, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and Marina Kellen, French Distinguished Visitor, American Academy in Berlin
talking with
Lisa Zeitz, WELTKUNST


The Whitney Museum of American Art is preparing a major retrospective of Jasper Johns’s work. Developed in close cooperation with the Philadelphia Museum, the exhibition will be staged simultaneously at both venues this autumn. Adam D. Weinberg, Director of the Whitney Museum since 2003, is responsible for one of the largest Jasper Johns collections in the world. Under his directorship the museum has made its mark with shows of emerging and established American artists as well as an outstanding education and outreach program. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of American art and his experience as a museum director, Weinberg discusses Jasper Johns and his key role as a pioneer of Pop art, as well as contemporary trends in American art.

Event to mark the artist’s 90th birthday
In cooperation with the American Academy, Berlin

In English with simultaneous interpretation into German.

€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

Adam Weinberg © Whitney Museum, New York

Adam Weinberg © Whitney Museum, New York

Friday, May 15, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Adam D. Weinberg, Director, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, and Marina Kellen, French Distinguished Visitor, American Academy in Berlin
talking with
Lisa Zeitz, WELTKUNST


The Whitney Museum of American Art is preparing a major retrospective of Jasper Johns’s work. Developed in close cooperation with the Philadelphia Museum, the exhibition will be staged simultaneously at both venues this autumn. Adam D. Weinberg, Director of the Whitney Museum since 2003, is responsible for one of the largest Jasper Johns collections in the world. Under his directorship the museum has made its mark with shows of emerging and established American artists as well as an outstanding education and outreach program. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of American art and his experience as a museum director, Weinberg discusses Jasper Johns and his key role as a pioneer of Pop art, as well as contemporary trends in American art.

Event to mark the artist’s 90th birthday
In cooperation with the American Academy, Berlin

In English with simultaneous interpretation into German.

€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Adam Weinberg © Whitney Museum, New York

Adam Weinberg © Whitney Museum, New York

Tickets

Art Talk at the Potsdam Museum
Claude Monet and Karl Hagemeister: Pioneers of Modern Art in France and Germany
Wednesday, May 20 7:30 p.m., Potsdam Museum, event room

Dr. Jutta Götzmann, Director, Potsdam Museum
Dr. Hendrikje Warmt, Research Fellow, Potsdam Museum
Dr. Ortrud Westheider, Director, Museum Barberini
Dr. Daniel Zamani, Curator, Museum Barberini
Chaired by Prof. Dr. Peter Raue, former Chair of the Friends of the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin

While the Museum Barberini presents a French impressionist, the Potsdam Museum next door simultaneously showcases works by the German impressionist Karl Hagemeister. Hagemeister, who lived in Werder on the Havel near Potsdam, was one of the pioneers of modern landscape paintings in Germany. Join the curators of the two exhibitions in conversation with Peter Raue to find out how strongly French impressionist landscape painting influenced German artists in the second half of the nineteenth century.

Entrance € 8
Booking: tel. 0331–289 68 68 or museum-geschichte@rathaus.potsdam.de

In cooperation with the Potsdam Museum – Forum für Kunst und Geschichte

Karl Hagemeister, Wiesenstück, 1906, oil on canvas, Potsdam Museum

Karl Hagemeister, Wiesenstück, 1906, oil on canvas, Potsdam Museum

Wednesday, May 20 7:30 p.m., Potsdam Museum, event room

Dr. Jutta Götzmann, Director, Potsdam Museum
Dr. Hendrikje Warmt, Research Fellow, Potsdam Museum
Dr. Ortrud Westheider, Director, Museum Barberini
Dr. Daniel Zamani, Curator, Museum Barberini
Chaired by Prof. Dr. Peter Raue, former Chair of the Friends of the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin

While the Museum Barberini presents a French impressionist, the Potsdam Museum next door simultaneously showcases works by the German impressionist Karl Hagemeister. Hagemeister, who lived in Werder on the Havel near Potsdam, was one of the pioneers of modern landscape paintings in Germany. Join the curators of the two exhibitions in conversation with Peter Raue to find out how strongly French impressionist landscape painting influenced German artists in the second half of the nineteenth century.

Entrance € 8
Booking: tel. 0331–289 68 68 or museum-geschichte@rathaus.potsdam.de

In cooperation with the Potsdam Museum – Forum für Kunst und Geschichte

Karl Hagemeister, Wiesenstück, 1906, oil on canvas, Potsdam Museum

Karl Hagemeister, Wiesenstück, 1906, oil on canvas, Potsdam Museum

Talk
Instants, Moments, Minutes: Monet and the Industrialization of Time
Thursday, May 28, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Dr. André Dombrowski, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

“I am getting so slow at my work that it makes me despair, but the further I get the more I realize that I will have to work hard to render what I am looking for: ‘immediacy,’” Monet wrote in 1890. Aiming to depict the fleeting effects of light and shade, he experienced a pressure to work fast that no painter had known until then. This was a period when social concepts of time were being transformed by industrialization, innovative modes of transport, and new norms of time and labor. Monet’s places are therefore inextricably linked to a temporal dimension.

André Dombrowski is Associate Professor of History of Art, with a focus on European art history of the nineteenth century, and author of Cézanne, Murder, and Modern Life. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, his lecture explores the relationship between the impressionist instant and the history of modern time-keeping.

€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

Claude Monet, Charing Cross Bridge, Reflections on the Thames, 1899–1901, Oil on canvas, The Baltimore Museum of Art

Claude Monet, Charing Cross Bridge, Reflections on the Thames, 1899–1901, Oil on canvas, The Baltimore Museum of Art

Thursday, May 28, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Dr. André Dombrowski, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

“I am getting so slow at my work that it makes me despair, but the further I get the more I realize that I will have to work hard to render what I am looking for: ‘immediacy,’” Monet wrote in 1890. Aiming to depict the fleeting effects of light and shade, he experienced a pressure to work fast that no painter had known until then. This was a period when social concepts of time were being transformed by industrialization, innovative modes of transport, and new norms of time and labor. Monet’s places are therefore inextricably linked to a temporal dimension.

André Dombrowski is Associate Professor of History of Art, with a focus on European art history of the nineteenth century, and author of Cézanne, Murder, and Modern Life. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, his lecture explores the relationship between the impressionist instant and the history of modern time-keeping.

€ 10 / concessions € 8

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Claude Monet, Charing Cross Bridge, Reflections on the Thames, 1899–1901, Oil on canvas, The Baltimore Museum of Art

Claude Monet, Charing Cross Bridge, Reflections on the Thames, 1899–1901, Oil on canvas, The Baltimore Museum of Art

Tickets

Extra Tours
Art and religion in dialogue
Air and Light = Heaven?
Thursday, April 23, 5 p.m., Foyer

Prof. Dr. Johann Ev. Hafner, theologian, University of Potsdam
Dr. Dorothee Entrup, art historian, Museum Barberini

Monet recorded the light and weather conditions of different locations and explored them in his art. He was particularly interested in the representation of air and light. In many religions, light has a metaphysical meaning that goes far beyond physics or meteorology. Behind natural light there shines the light of Creation, the so-called “primordial light.” Taking a painting from the exhibition as its starting point, this conversation will examine Monet’s work from an art-historical and theological perspective. There will be an opportunity to continue the conversation in the foyer.

€ 3 (excluding entry ticket)

Tickets

Claude Monet, Étretat, Sunset, 1882/83, Oil on canvas, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh. Purchased with funds from the State of North Carolina

Claude Monet, Étretat, Sunset, 1882/83, Oil on canvas, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh. Purchased with funds from the State of North Carolina

Thursday, April 23, 5 p.m., Foyer

Prof. Dr. Johann Ev. Hafner, theologian, University of Potsdam
Dr. Dorothee Entrup, art historian, Museum Barberini

Monet recorded the light and weather conditions of different locations and explored them in his art. He was particularly interested in the representation of air and light. In many religions, light has a metaphysical meaning that goes far beyond physics or meteorology. Behind natural light there shines the light of Creation, the so-called “primordial light.” Taking a painting from the exhibition as its starting point, this conversation will examine Monet’s work from an art-historical and theological perspective. There will be an opportunity to continue the conversation in the foyer.

€ 3 (excluding entry ticket)

Claude Monet, Étretat, Sunset, 1882/83, Oil on canvas, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh. Purchased with funds from the State of North Carolina

Claude Monet, Étretat, Sunset, 1882/83, Oil on canvas, North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh. Purchased with funds from the State of North Carolina

Tickets

Guided tour exploring Monet’s flowers and the gardens of the Freundschaftsinsel in Potsdam
Thursday, May 28, 4 p.m., Foyer

Jörg Näthe, former head gardener of the island gardens, Chair of the Freunde der Freundschaftsinsel e.V. Potsdam
Andrea Schmidt, art historian, Museum Barberini

Monet’s paintings of the paradise that he created for himself, his garden in Giverny, are among his most accomplished works. The intricately designed water-lily pond and the exuberant planting, planned to look beautiful in every season, were the source of inspiration for countless floral pieces and the famous water-lily paintings. The tour starts with Monet’s floral paintings in the exhibition and then takes visitors outdoors to the nearby Freundschaftsinsel (Friendship Island) with its island gardens, which were created in 1841. The horticulturist Jörg Nähte will discuss the history of the gardens and provide insights into three eras of garden design. He will introduce visitors to some of the 1000 species of herbaceous perennials and 250 species of irises growing in the island gardens, including those bred by the distinguished nurseryman Karl Foerster (1874–1970) in his garden in Potsdam. Taking visitors from the galleries of the Museum Barberini to the Freundschaftsinsel, this tour explores floral sources of inspiration in Monet’s garden at Giverny and their connection to flowers which we can admire in Potsdam’s gardens.

€ 3 (excluding entry ticket)

The tour will still take place in the event of rain.

Tickets

Museum Barberini © Helge Mundt

Museum Barberini © Helge Mundt

Thursday, May 28, 4 p.m., Foyer

Jörg Näthe, former head gardener of the island gardens, Chair of the Freunde der Freundschaftsinsel e.V. Potsdam
Andrea Schmidt, art historian, Museum Barberini

Monet’s paintings of the paradise that he created for himself, his garden in Giverny, are among his most accomplished works. The intricately designed water-lily pond and the exuberant planting, planned to look beautiful in every season, were the source of inspiration for countless floral pieces and the famous water-lily paintings. The tour starts with Monet’s floral paintings in the exhibition and then takes visitors outdoors to the nearby Freundschaftsinsel (Friendship Island) with its island gardens, which were created in 1841. The horticulturist Jörg Nähte will discuss the history of the gardens and provide insights into three eras of garden design. He will introduce visitors to some of the 1000 species of herbaceous perennials and 250 species of irises growing in the island gardens, including those bred by the distinguished nurseryman Karl Foerster (1874–1970) in his garden in Potsdam. Taking visitors from the galleries of the Museum Barberini to the Freundschaftsinsel, this tour explores floral sources of inspiration in Monet’s garden at Giverny and their connection to flowers which we can admire in Potsdam’s gardens.

€ 3 (excluding entry ticket)

The tour will still take place in the event of rain.

Museum Barberini © Helge Mundt

Museum Barberini © Helge Mundt

Tickets

The Art of Calm
Quiet Morning
Yoga and Meditation

For all early risers and art-loving yogis. Join a 90-minute yoga session on Sunday morning inspired by the current exhibition, taught by Anna and Sandra. From 11 o’clock, participants can enjoy the original paintings in quiet contemplation.

Sunday, May 3,

from 9:30 to 11 a.m.


€ 18 / reduced € 14 (per session)
For holders of a current Barberini Friends card the reduced price applies.
The ticket price includes entry to the museum after the yoga session.

Please bring your own yoga mat and cushion.

May 3

Yoga and Meditation

For all early risers and art-loving yogis. Join a 90-minute yoga session on Sunday morning inspired by the current exhibition, taught by Anna and Sandra. From 11 o’clock, participants can enjoy the original paintings in quiet contemplation.

Sunday, May 3,

from 9:30 to 11 a.m.


€ 18 / reduced € 14 (per session)
For holders of a current Barberini Friends card the reduced price applies.
The ticket price includes entry to the museum after the yoga session.

Please bring your own yoga mat and cushion.

May 3

Readings
LIT:potsdam » Reading and Conversation
Keeping an Eye Open
Sunday, May 31, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Julian Barnes, writer
Thomas Böhm, rbb, chair

Julian Barnes is a world-renowned novelist. What few people know is that he has also been writing about art for decades. The award-winning British author will join us in Potsdam to read from his collection Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art, which has just been published in German translation (Kunst sehen). Originally a lexicographer and journalist, Barnes approaches painting from unusual angles, sometimes literary, sometimes historical or philosophical, and always personal. Wearing his erudition lightly, Barnes tells us about his favorite painters from romanticism to postmodernity, from Géricault, Delacroix, Manet, and Cézanne to Lucian Freud, retracing the story of art up to the present day. Barnes looks at paintings without preconceptions, free from academic constraints. Intertwining interpretations of paintings with biographical details, he tells entertaining stories, finds fascinating connections and enlightens us with his astute observations. His essays in Keeping an Eye Open are an inspiration for everyone who enjoys art.

The reading will be in English. The conversation will be interpreted into German.

In collaboration with LIT:potsdam.

€ 15 / concessions € 12

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

Tickets

© Urszula Soltys

© Urszula Soltys

Sunday, May 31, 7 p.m., Auditorium

Julian Barnes, writer
Thomas Böhm, rbb, chair

Julian Barnes is a world-renowned novelist. What few people know is that he has also been writing about art for decades. The award-winning British author will join us in Potsdam to read from his collection Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art, which has just been published in German translation (Kunst sehen). Originally a lexicographer and journalist, Barnes approaches painting from unusual angles, sometimes literary, sometimes historical or philosophical, and always personal. Wearing his erudition lightly, Barnes tells us about his favorite painters from romanticism to postmodernity, from Géricault, Delacroix, Manet, and Cézanne to Lucian Freud, retracing the story of art up to the present day. Barnes looks at paintings without preconceptions, free from academic constraints. Intertwining interpretations of paintings with biographical details, he tells entertaining stories, finds fascinating connections and enlightens us with his astute observations. His essays in Keeping an Eye Open are an inspiration for everyone who enjoys art.

The reading will be in English. The conversation will be interpreted into German.

In collaboration with LIT:potsdam.

€ 15 / concessions € 12

Ticket price includes admission to the exhibition one hour before the event.

© Urszula Soltys

© Urszula Soltys

Tickets

UNESCO World Book Day
Monet’s Letters
Thursday, April 23 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Auditorium

To mark UNESCO World Book Day, we are organizing a reading festival. Museum visitors and staff, as well as secondary school students, will read from Monet’s letters and from children’s books about the artist. Readings in French, English, and German.

Every hour on the hour, first session 11 a.m., last session 3 p.m.
Free for museum visitors

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

Thursday, April 23 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Auditorium

To mark UNESCO World Book Day, we are organizing a reading festival. Museum visitors and staff, as well as secondary school students, will read from Monet’s letters and from children’s books about the artist. Readings in French, English, and German.

Every hour on the hour, first session 11 a.m., last session 3 p.m.
Free for museum visitors

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

Claude Monet: The Cliff and the Porte d'Aval, 1885, private collection

Films
In cooperation with the Filmmuseum Potsdam

To accompany the exhibition Monet: Places, the Filmmuseum Potsdam is showing documentaries about Claude Monet and his work, as well as feature films shot and set in locations that are central to Monet’s life.

Image: An Officer and a Spy, 2019 © Weltkino Filmverleih

Image: An Officer and a Spy, 2019 © Weltkino Filmverleih

In cooperation with the Filmmuseum Potsdam

To accompany the exhibition Monet: Places, the Filmmuseum Potsdam is showing documentaries about Claude Monet and his work, as well as feature films shot and set in locations that are central to Monet’s life.

Image: An Officer and a Spy, 2019 © Weltkino Filmverleih

Image: An Officer and a Spy, 2019 © Weltkino Filmverleih

Information
All films are shown at the Filmmuseum Potsdam: 
Breite Str. 1a/Marstall, 14467 Potsdam, Germany 
Tickets for all screenings may be purchased at the Filmmuseum Potsdam.
Ticket reservations:  T +49 331 27181-12 or ticket@filmmuseum-potsdam.de

Please note: Visitors who present a Museum Barberini ticket at these screenings will receive a discount on their ticket to the Filmmuseum Potsdam. Ticketholders of these films will also receive discounted admission to the Museum Barberini.


Saturday, March 21, 7:30 p.m.

I, Claude Monet
Dir. Phil Grabsky, documentary, UK 2017, English with German subtitles, 90 min.

Shot on location at the different spots where Monet painted, this documentary features his most popular works. Told through the artist’s own words from his extensive correspondence, the film offers a moving glimpse into the life of this great artist.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, April 18, 7:30 p.m.

Le Havre
Dir. Aki Kaurismäki, Finland/France/Germany 2011, starring André Wilms, Kati Outinen, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, Finland/France/Germany, 93 min.

The Finnish filmmaker Aki Kaurismäki, known for his deadpan, laconic humor, tells the story of an aging former artist turned shoeshiner who tries to save a refugee child. Set in Normandy, the cradle of impressionism, and in the coastal city of Le Havre, an important location for Monet’s artistic development, the film uses light and shade to great effect. With its atmospheric twilight scenes, it is reminiscent of the great cinematic masterpieces of French poetic realism.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Thursday, May 14, 7:30 p.m.

Claude Monet. Im Licht des Augenblicks
Documentary by Mathias Frick, ARTE/ZDF 2020, 52 min.

Produced to accompany the exhibition at the Museum Barberini, this film takes us on a journey to the places and landscapes from which Monet drew inspiration for his paintings. From the boulevards in Paris to Rouen Cathedral, along the Seine village Argenteuil and Vétheuil, from Étretat on the Norman coast to his garden in Giverny. A film about the passionate relationship of a painter to nature, its motifs and nuances of light.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5


Saturday, May 30, 2020, 7:30 p.m.

J’Accuse (An Officer and a Spy)
Dir. Roman Polanski, starring Jean Dujardin, Louis Garrel, Emmanuelle Seigner, France/Italy 2019, French with German subtitles, 132 min.

In January 1895, the French artillery officer Alfred Dreyfus is accused of high treason and sentenced to life imprisonment in a degrading ceremony. One of the witnesses at his trial, Marie-Georges Picquart, is appointed chief of the army’s intelligence service. Picquart slowly becomes convinced of Dreyfus’s innocence and struggles to expose the truth. Polanski’s film is part courtroom drama, part genre picture of Paris at the end of the nineteenth century. The so-called Dreyfus affair had wide-reaching consequences for French politics. Intellectuals and artists like Émile Zola and Claude Monet campaigned for Dreyfus to be acquitted.

Filmmuseum Potsdam
€ 6 / concessions € 5